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quantself

From elsewhere: Tracking health indicators hints towards disruptive innovation in doctor patient relationship

Pew Internet’s Susannah Fox, today, released the official report behind her amazing Stanford Medicine X talk. The report is a great read for data geeks, health wonks and ePatients alike. But there’s one part in particular I find especially indicative of an impending disruption in how we approach medical care as patients.

According to Pew:

Seven in ten (69%) U.S. adults track a health indicator for themselves or a loved one and many say this activity has changed their overall approach to health, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project.

This is the first national survey measuring health data tracking, which has been shown in clinical studies to be a tool for improving outcomes, particularly among people trying to lose weight or manage a chronic condition.

Of all the results, I find one in particular compelling:

40% of trackers say it has led them to ask a doctor new questions or to get a second opinion from another doctor.

I’m predicting 2013 and 2014 as the years we see a sea-change towards true consumer-driven health. In the past, wonks have spoken about high deductible plans and health spending accounts as the economic vehicle to compelling consumer behavior. The problem with that version is it assumes people will consume less healthcare services if they are footing the bill.

There is some truth regarding spending usage. But, largely sick people will seek care and people without access —via insurance or a government program —will delay care until the need is chronic and more costly.

What I’m excited about, based on the Pew results, is the potential of true consumer driven healthcare. Today, it’s increasingly easier to wear a gadget and get direct access to cutting edge lab tests. For $99, 23andMe will examine your DNA an report back some pretty amazing data.

So, if 40% of people report asking new questions based on following their own health indicators, how long before patients become the initiators of a care plan? Rather than rely on doctors to discover whats wrong with us, we’re moving a world where we might know more about ourselves before we seek a doctor than after seeing one.

That idea might challenge some people, including doctors. Rest assured, it doesn’t eliminate the need for doctors. We’re simply looking at a period of disruptive innovation which will change the role of physicians (in some circumstances). It’s a bit like coming to an architect with your own rough draft of blueprints.

For more about Susannah Fox, Pew and the report, check out the video interview from Medicine X:

Susannah Fox - Medicine X Conversation from Larry Chu on Vimeo.

Quant Self gaining popularity in other circles

I'm continuing to see references to self quantification appear outside of the niche world of quantified self devotees. This week on the TWiT podcast network, two of Leo Laporte's shows featured conversations about capturing, measuring and analyzing data about our own health. Now, certainly these two shows represent niche communities and interests of their own. TWiG focuses on cloud computer, social networking and Google. Security Now is about, you guessed it, security. What I find particularly exciting is both shows feature discussions about using personal health devices without knowing the term quantified self, suggesting the ideas of self quantification are creeping into other areas; the long tail is beginning to widen.

On Episode 138 of This Week in Google, the hosts discussed the Nike Fuelband device. Nike's Fuelband wrist-worn gadget made a splashy debute at this year South By South West, selling out via their pop-up store. The Fuelband, which is often compaired to the defunct Jawbone Up, is very similar to the FitBit (which I still think is the best device in the space - love mine!).

Here is a link to the exact position of the discussion on the Fuelband.

Host Jeff Jarvis describes, these devices as "the internet of things, and things tend to be you..."  At last year's Stanford Med 2.0 event, Dr. Bryan Vartabedian  described personal health devices as "An API into the patient." An API - application programmer's interface - is a term in computer programming and hardware which references a programmer's ability to connect with another program or device. The point Dr. V and Mr. Jarvis are marking is that quantified self devices give users and providers access to retime data about health and actives, without needing a lagging lab test or resource-intensive diagnostic study.

On episode 344 of the wonderfully nerdy Security Now podcast, host Steve Gibson discusses his penchant for "conducting experiments on [himself]." In 2009, Mr. Gibson, usually focused on technology security, released a special hour long discussion on his studies of vitamin D. This week, he briefly mentions an expriment he conducted on eliminating most carbohydrates from his diet.

Editorial note - I've discovered in my own move to a mostly vegan diet, there many differing opinions on what constitutes the perfect diet and just as many studies to back them up. That said, I'm not sure I completely agree every part of his food-related discussion with host Leo Laporte. Nevertheless, Mr. Gibson has an almost obsessive habit of regular blood draws and lab tests.

You and watch their discussion on dietary changes and how they affected his lab results here.

Security Now 344: Your Questions, Steve's Answers #139 - YouTube.