When giants stumbleHDR Sunset

Local Cleveland channel News 5 reporter Cassandra Nist posted today:

The Cleveland Clinic announced Wednesday morning that they will be cutting $330 million from their 2014 budget.

“This is a process and the Cleveland Clinic is focused on driving a more efficient healthcare system. The goal is to make healthcare more affordable [and] efficient to patients,” Cleveland Clinic spokeswoman Eileen Sheil said.

The Cleveland Clinic acknowledges that there will be a reduction in the workforce, however the numbers are unknown at this time.

Shiel said this is “not unique to the Cleveland Clinic“ and that it is ”happening to hospitals across the nation.”

Our large healthcare providers —health systems and big hospitals —are in trouble. Public and political concern about hight costs are putting pressure on providers to lean out their organizations. (The true source of much of that cost may be out of their control, by the way). Simultaneously, we are living through a sea change in how care is being delivered. We’re not as far away from the smart phone physical as one may think.

Let’s also not forget population health. Forget concerns about about bridging the gap between the payment models. Do we really know how to take our existing large, complex healthcare ecosystem and turn it 180 degrees towards prevention and wellness?

Recently, while speaking to a group of hospital leaders, I shared an analogy I’ve been kicking around in my brain: these systems are giants and they won’t suddenly fall over. Instead, like Atlas, they will become increasingly unable to bear their the weight and will begin to stumble. Some, from time to time, might even drop to a knee to catch their breath.

Is Cleveland Clinic the first giant to stumble?

I’m all for cutting the fat and being more efficient. But how much of that is spin and how much reflects concerns around constrained reembursement and a changing care model?

Not to be all grey clouds and Andy Rooney here… These giants are giants for a reason. I have great faith in their sophistication, leadership and clinical abilities. Unlike small community hospitals, I doubt we’ll see any of them fall down outright. The smart ones, like Cleveland Clinic, are already thinking about:

  • Population health - Cleveland Clinic’s lauded bundled payment program for Lowes and Walmart is a clever example.
  • Patient engagement - Cleveland Clinic’s highly regarded Empathy video shows a serious commitment to the human side of healthcare.
  • Integrated model - The clinic model, with its employed physicians and team-based care, continues to make a lot of sense. I think we’ll see large health plans follow Lowes and Walmart, with renowned clinics like Cleveland Clinic, Mayo Clinic, Stanford, and Johns Hopkins, become preferred centers of excellence for these plans (further challenging community systems and hospitals).