Pew Internet’s Susannah Fox, today, released the official report behind her amazing Stanford Medicine X talk. The report is a great read for data geeks, health wonks and ePatients alike. But there’s one part in particular I find especially indicative of an impending disruption in how we approach medical care as patients.

According to Pew:

Seven in ten (69%) U.S. adults track a health indicator for themselves or a loved one and many say this activity has changed their overall approach to health, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project.

This is the first national survey measuring health data tracking, which has been shown in clinical studies to be a tool for improving outcomes, particularly among people trying to lose weight or manage a chronic condition.

Of all the results, I find one in particular compelling:

40% of trackers say it has led them to ask a doctor new questions or to get a second opinion from another doctor.

I’m predicting 2013 and 2014 as the years we see a sea-change towards true consumer-driven health. In the past, wonks have spoken about high deductible plans and health spending accounts as the economic vehicle to compelling consumer behavior. The problem with that version is it assumes people will consume less healthcare services if they are footing the bill.

There is some truth regarding spending usage. But, largely sick people will seek care and people without access —via insurance or a government program —will delay care until the need is chronic and more costly.

What I’m excited about, based on the Pew results, is the potential of true consumer driven healthcare. Today, it’s increasingly easier to wear a gadget and get direct access to cutting edge lab tests. For $99, 23andMe will examine your DNA an report back some pretty amazing data.

So, if 40% of people report asking new questions based on following their own health indicators, how long before patients become the initiators of a care plan? Rather than rely on doctors to discover whats wrong with us, we’re moving a world where we might know more about ourselves before we seek a doctor than after seeing one.

That idea might challenge some people, including doctors. Rest assured, it doesn’t eliminate the need for doctors. We’re simply looking at a period of disruptive innovation which will change the role of physicians (in some circumstances). It’s a bit like coming to an architect with your own rough draft of blueprints.

For more about Susannah Fox, Pew and the report, check out the video interview from Medicine X:

Susannah Fox - Medicine X Conversation from Larry Chu on Vimeo.