Bossless Office (Photo: Illustration by Marc Boutavant)

…“Management is a term to me that feels very twentieth century, … That 100-year chunk of time when the world was very industrialized, and a company would make something that could be stamped out 10 million times and figured out a way to ship it easily, you needed the hierarchy for that. I think this century is more about building intelligent teams.”

—Simon Anderson, CEO of DreamHost

One of my biggest concerns about the future of healthcare is the industry’s attractiveness to bright young people. Let’s face it, unless you are doig cutting edge clinical work, there’s not a lot in healthcare which compares to Google’s sushi bars, segways and wifi-blanketed busses.

The hospital workplace is still one of the most conservative environments in corporate america. Dark suits, wood paneled board rooms and hierarchy are the norms. I haven’t spoken to many college-aged young adults who are anxious to flock to that kind of workplace.

Enter the Bossless Office. A feature this week in New York Magazine looks at an emerging trend in management, or the lack of it.

There’s a lot to like about this idea and its application to the healthcare environment. Could it help entice more of the start-up, rapid pace, rapid reward crowd? I think so.

This structure—largely flat and very flexible—is especially appealing to those new to the workforce, twenty-somethings who tend to approach work differently from their parents. “The way workers are motivated is changing,” says Anderson of DreamHost. “Twenty years ago, it was about higher pay. Now it’s more about finding your work meaningful and interesting.” As more and more millennials enter positions of power in the business world, Anderson believes we will soon reach a point where hierarchy itself is “passé.”