melI’ve written before about the changing workforce and my concerns about healthcare’s readiness to accept those changes. This week, Tom Agan (from Riva) writes in The New York Times about Embracing the Millennials’ Mind-Set at Work:

To compete for the best millennial talent, companies are having to change in fundamental ways. … Goldman made the change partly because it was losing millennials to start-ups. But start-ups typically offer less pay and equally long hours, which suggests that providing more time off isn’t the only answer. If corporate cultures don’t align with the transparency, free flow of information, and inclusiveness that millennials highly value — and that are also essential for learning and successful innovation — the competitiveness of many established businesses will suffer.

Anecdotal though it may be, I’m seeing a trend in healthcare. Fewer and fewer bright young people are queuing up for the dark suit, long hour, old white men’s club of hospital administration. Instead they go to work for a healthcare startup, or other unexpected players like Walgreens, Target or SG2.

In short, I’m worried we’re facing something akin to a brain drain in traditional healthcare —an energy drain. We’re notoriously slow to change, particularly when it comes to culture. Paternalism is as strong in administration as it is in clinical care.

How do we get hip?

  • Embrace - Tom Agan suggests: “…rather than complaining, it’s time to embrace millennials for what they can offer, to add experience from older workers to the mix, and to watch innovation explode”
  • Launch a skunk works - the term skunk works* comes from of Lockheed Martin’s advanced development programs. The idea is a start-up inside a traditional company. What if hospitals offered millennials and others the opportunity to experience start-up culture?
  • Try Google’s 20% rule - Google’s famed 20% rule was the catalyst behind gmail. Googlers are encouraged, in some cases required, to spend 20% of their time working on a project unrelated to their core job. Can you imagine if health systems encouraged the same kind of time sharing?

*Via Wikipedia:

The designation “skunk works”, or “skunkworks”, is widely used in business, engineering, and technical fields to describe a group within an organization given a high degree of autonomy and unhampered by bureaucracy, tasked with working on advanced or secret projects.